Shady Dealer Banner

Menu

University Fails Mental Health Inspection

By Breck Radulovic
May 5, 2018

Bartlett Dining Hall

Bartlett Dining Commons

The University of Chicago failed an April 16 mental health inspection because of insufficient mental health resources, unsatisfactory support for those in need, and actively hostile policies toward students struggling with mental health, according to a report posted last Friday on EveryBlock Chicago.  

The University was found to be at “high risk” by the City of Chicago’s Department of Mental Health Protection Program after an initial inspection found evidence of Title IX failures, poor mental health services across the campus, and a demanding work environment that leaves many students physically and financially drained. 

According to the report, the inspector observed over 20 droppings in the University Student Counseling Services. “There were droppings everywhere,” Inspector Martin Hall said. “SCS dropping students who still needed their help, students being dropped off at Lake Shore Hospital, and the University forcing students to drop out after leaves of absence.”  

The inspector also noted that the SCS offices on Woodlawn were insufficient for the number of students who requested their services, and that certain individuals experienced negative outcomes as direct result of the University’s negligence.  

For example, the report listed several cases--including both undergraduate and graduate students--where the University failed to provide the bare minimum of support for its community. Anxiety and depression were reportedly written off by the Administration as merely a part of the culture, and other mental illnesses were considered a direct liability to the University’s reputation and profits.  

Though the University claims SCS is easily accessible, an inspector’s comment stated that there are often long wait times to see a counselor and most students were referred off-campus for care. 

The University has also failed mental health inspections in the past. 

In 2012, a failed mental health inspection caused the University to insincerely promise to change its ways. The College also failed a mental health inspection in 2013, after similar risks related to student mental health were discovered.

The University News Office did not immediately respond for comment